How to resize ext3 on DL360 running RH 7.2

With the system up:
Get current disk configuration using df, df -h, fdisk -l /dev/ida/c0d0, and fdisk -s /dev/ida/c0d0p7 (for any partitions you want to resize).

Replace the left drive with a 36GB drive, and allow mirror to re-create.

Once completed, replace the right drive with a 36GB drive and allow mirror to re-create.

Boot system off the Smart Start 5.50 CD.

Select Array Configuration Utility.

Click cancel on the message regarding unallocated space.

Select the Logical drive and click Expand. This process takes between 2 and 3 hours to complete.

Boot the system in single user mode.

Make sure all the drives are mounted.

Get current disk configuration using df, df -h, fdisk -l /dev/ida/c0d0, and fdisk -s /dev/ida/c0d0p7 (for any partitions you want to resize). Fdisk should show more available cylinders than before.

Umount /opt.

Umount /dev/ida/c0d0p7.

Fsck -n /dev/ida/c0d0p7.

Tune2fs -O ^has_journal /dev/ida/c0d0p7.

Fdisk /dev/ida/c0d0.

Select p.

# df
Filesystem 1k-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 4031872 3481192 345864 91% /
/dev/ida/c0d0p7 6694568 6151136 203368 97% /opt
none 579996 0 579996 0% /dev/shm
/dev/ida/c0d0p6 2602280 2259876 210216 92% /var

# df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 3.8G 3.4G 337M 91% /
/dev/ida/c0d0p7 6.4G 5.9G 198M 97% /opt
none 566M 0 566M 0% /dev/shm
/dev/ida/c0d0p6 2.5G 2.2G 205M 92% /var

# fdisk -l /dev/ida/c0d0

Disk /dev/ida/c0d0: 255 heads, 32 sectors, 8716 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8160 * 512 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/ida/c0d0p1 1 9 36704 12 Compaq diagnostics
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 * 10 1013 4096320 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p3 1014 4357 13643520 5 Extended
/dev/ida/c0d0p5 1014 2042 4198304 82 Linux swap
/dev/ida/c0d0p6 2043 2690 2643824 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p7 2691 4357 6801344 83 Linux

# lsof /opt

# umount /opt

# fsck -n /dev/ida/c0d0p7
fsck 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
e2fsck 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
/opt: clean, 33466/850304 files, 1564478/1700336 blocks

# tune2fs -O ^has_journal /dev/ida/c0d0p7
tune2fs 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)

# fdisk /dev/ida/c0d0

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 8716.
There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,
and could in certain setups cause problems with:
1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)
2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs
(e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/ida/c0d0: 255 heads, 32 sectors, 8716 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8160 * 512 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/ida/c0d0p1 1 9 36704 12 Compaq diagnostics
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 * 10 1013 4096320 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p3 1014 4357 13643520 5 Extended
/dev/ida/c0d0p5 1014 2042 4198304 82 Linux swap
/dev/ida/c0d0p6 2043 2690 2643824 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p7 2691 4357 6801344 83 Linux

Command (m for help): d
Partition number (1-7): 3

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/ida/c0d0: 255 heads, 32 sectors, 8716 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8160 * 512 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/ida/c0d0p1 1 9 36704 12 Compaq diagnostics
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 * 10 1013 4096320 83 Linux

Command (m for help): n
Command action
e extended
p primary partition (1-4)
e
Partition number (1-4): 3
First cylinder (1014-8716, default 1014):
Using default value 1014
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1014-8716, default 8716):
Using default value 8716

Command (m for help): n
Command action
l logical (5 or over)
p primary partition (1-4)
l
First cylinder (1014-8716, default 1014):
Using default value 1014
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1014-8716, default 8716): 2042

Command (m for help): n
Command action
l logical (5 or over)
p primary partition (1-4)
l
First cylinder (2043-8716, default 2043):
Using default value 2043
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (2043-8716, default 8716): 2690

Command (m for help): n
Command action
l logical (5 or over)
p primary partition (1-4)
l
First cylinder (2691-8716, default 2691):
Using default value 2691
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (2691-8716, default 8716):
Using default value 8716

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/ida/c0d0: 255 heads, 32 sectors, 8716 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8160 * 512 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/ida/c0d0p1 1 9 36704 12 Compaq diagnostics
/dev/ida/c0d0p2 * 10 1013 4096320 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p3 1014 8716 31428240 5 Extended
/dev/ida/c0d0p5 1014 2042 4198304 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p6 2043 2690 2643824 83 Linux
/dev/ida/c0d0p7 2691 8716 24586064 83 Linux

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered!

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Re-read table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.
Reboot your system to ensure the partition table is updated.

WARNING: If you have created or modified any DOS 6.x
partitions, please see the fdisk manual page for additional
information.
Syncing disks.

# shutdown -r now

Boot in single user mode

# resize2fs /dev/ida/c0d0p7
resize2fs 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
The filesystem on /dev/ida/c0d0p7 is now 6146516 blocks long.

# fsck -n /dev/ida/c0d0p7
fsck 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
e2fsck 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
/opt: clean, 33466/3074176 files, 1626059/6146516 blocks

# tune2fs -j /dev/ida/c0d0p7
tune2fs 1.26 (3-Feb-2002)
Creating journal inode: done
This filesystem will be automatically checked every -1 mounts or
0 days, whichever comes first. Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.

# shutdown -r now

Fedora 7 mount usb drive

This is the command I used to mount a cruzer usb stick drive, so that user with uid 502 could write to the drive:

mount -rw -t vfat -o exec,uid=502,umask=0000 /dev/sdb1 /mnt/cardreader

Note: Found the device by doing a fdisk -l after connecting the drive.

Mail configuration information for many services.

I found this information courtesy of SnapperMail
( http://www.snappermail.com/support/isp.cfm ):

ISP/Mail Service Configurations
For your convenience we’ve listed configurations for some of the more common ISPs and mail services here.

* AOL
* AT&T Wireless
* AT&T Worldnet
* Cableone
* Charter
* Cingular
* Comcast
* Earthlink
* FastMail
* GMail
* GoDaddy
* InsightBB
* Mac.com
* Mindspring
* Network Solutions
* SBC Global (via Prodigy)
* SBC Global (Yahoo Powered)
* SprintPCS
* USA.net
* Utopia Systems
* Webmail.us
* Yahoo Mail

Wireless Carrier SMTP Configurations
If you are subscribed to a wireless carrier and you find that your ISP is blocking access to your normal SMTP with “relaying denied errors”, try using your carrier’s SMTP instead. We’ve listed some common wireless carriers below:

* Alltel
* AT&T Wireless
* Bell Mobility Canada
* Comcast
* PacBell
* SprintPCS
* T-Mobile (USA)
* Verizon
* Vodafone

Other Useful Configuration Links
If your settings are not available in this section, you may find some of these links below useful:

* A listing of mail server configurations for many International (non US) ISPs
* A listing of mail server configurations for many US based ISPs
* German ISP configurations for SnapperMail

AOL

This information requires (for IMAP capability) that you have SnapperMail Enterprise edition installed on your device. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

IMAP Server: imap.aol.com
Username: your AOL screen name
Password: your AOL password

SMTP Server: smtp.aol.com
Username: your AOL screen name
Password: your AOL password

Tap the “More…” button in the server account settings. In that window, enter the following:

IMAP4 SETTINGS:
Use Port: 143

SMTP SETTINGS:
Use Port: 587

AT&T Wireless

1. Make sure that after you establish your mMode account, you pick your own username so that you get a “username@mobile.att.net” style email address. This will be your second “@mobile.att.net” email address, the first being [your-cellphone-number]@mobile.att.net

2. To configure SnapperMail to send email using AT&T Wireless’ POP3 server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the following for the Incoming Mail settings:

POP3 Server: pop.mymmode.com
Username: [username@mmode.com]
Password: [your mMode password]

3. To configure SnapperMail to send email using AT&T Wireless’ SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: smtp.attwireless.net
Username: [your mMode username†]
Password: [your mMode password]

4. AT&T wireless will refuse authentication unless your email address is the same as your mMode email address:
* In your SnapperMail Account settings under Identity (Edit Account | Identity), enter your mMode email address, i.e. username@mobile.att.net
* If you want replies to go your normal email address, enter it in the “Reply To” area (Edit Account | Identity | Reply To).

5. AT&T Wireless appears to have quietly rolled out a new SMTP server. If the configuration in #3 and #4 above does not work for you, please try the following:

SMTP Server: pdasmtp.attwireless.net
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

NOTE: This server is only usable for devices on the ATTWS network, and according to some users it may no longer be available.
6. Another new AT&T Wireless server appears to have been rolled out or it will be soon. If none of the above configurations work for you, please try the following:

SMTP Server: smtp.mymmode.com
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

NOTE: This server is only usable for devices on the ATTWS network.

† – do not append “@mobile.att.net”

NOTE: AT&T Wireless is supposedly coming to “end of life” due to the merger with Cingular. Here is a link to the Cingular settings.

AT&T Worldnet

These instructions require that you have the Premier or Enterprise edition of SnapperMail. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: ipostoffice.worldnet.att.net
Username: Anywho@worldnet.att.net (make sure you use upper/lower case, and replace “Anywho” with your user ID)
Password: [your email password]

SMTP Server: imailhost.worldnet.att.net
Username: Anywho (do not type @worldnet.att.net, use upper/lower case, and replace “Anywho” with your user ID)
Password: [your email password]

Tap the “More…” button in the server account settings. In that window, enter the following:
POP3 SETTINGS:
Use Port 995
Uncheck: Use APOP Authentication
Check/Pick: Always Secure (wrapped Port)
Check: Always trust Server

SMTP SETTINGS:
Use Port 465
Check: POP before send (or uncheck it, whichever way works for you)
Check/Pick: Always Secure (wrapped Port)
Check: Always trust Server

Cableone

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.cableone.net
Username: your email username
Password: your email password

SMTP Server: authmail.cableone.net
Username: your email username
Password: your email password

Charter

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.charter.net
Username: your full Charter Email address
Password: your email password

SMTP Server: Charter’s SMTP server is apparently unavailable outside their network. You’ll have to use an alternate SMTP server such as the one your cellular carrier provides.

Cingular

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), use the information below:

For your incoming mail you may either use a POP3 compatible email account with an Internet Service Provider (ISP) of your choice, or you can use your mmode account. No matter what, outgoing mail must go through the mymmode server.

Start SnapperMail and either click on Accounts -> New Account.. or Accounts -> Edit Accounts… (to change an existing account). You will be creating or editing a POP account. Do NOT enter the [] – they are used to hold a description of what information you need to enter.

Identity tab:
– Your name: [your name]
– Email address: [your POP3 mail name] or [mmode_username]@mmode.com (not mymmode.com!)
– Reply to address (optional): [leave blank]

Server tab – Incoming Mail:
– POP3 Server: [your ISP’s POP3 server] or pop.mymmode.com
– Username: [your POP3 mail account or mmode login name]
– Password: [your POP3 or mmode password]

Outgoing mail:
– SMTP Server: smtp.mymmode.com
– Username: [your mmode username]
– Password: [your mmode password]

Click on the ‘More…’ button on the lower right of the screen, then set:

POP3 Settings:
– Use Port: 110

SMTP Settings:
– Use Port: 25
– Secure if available
– Select ‘Always trust server’

Rules tab: See the Snappermail manual for details on each of these features as they are your choice. Under ‘More rules…’, BCC a copy of outgoing mail to your POP3 email address so that you have a record of what you sent from Snappermail.

Alternate SMTP Settings (if the above information does not work):

Outgoing mail:
– SMTP Server: cwmx.com
– Username: [leave blank]
– Password: [leave blank]

Comcast

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.comcast.net
Username: [your Comcast username] (only the part before the “@” character, not your whole Email address)
Password: [your Comcast password]

SMTP Server: smtp.comcast.net
Username: [your Comcast username] (only the part before the “@” character, not your whole Email address)
Password: [your Comcast password]

Earthlink

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.earthlink.net
Username: [your Earthlink username]
Password: [your Earthlink password]

SMTP Server: smtpauth.earthlink.net
Username: [your Earthlink email address†]
Password: [your Earthlink password]

† – instead of your username such as “foobar” this should be your full email address e.g. foobar@earthlink.net

FastMail

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

IMAP Server††††: mail.messagingengine.com
Username: [your FastMail email address†]
Password: [your FastMail password]

POP3 Server††: mail.messagingengine.com
Username: [your FastMail email address†]
Password: [your FastMail password]

SMTP Server†††: mail.messagingengine.com
Username: [your FastMail email address†]
Password: [your FastMail password]

For unsecured connections (without SSL), just accept the default port numbers (on the “More…” button screen). If SMTP port 25 has been blocked by your carrier, tap on the “More…” button and change the SMTP port to 26.

† – instead of your username such as “myname” this should be your full email FastMail address e.g. myname@fastmail.fm, myname@fastmail.us, myname@sent.com, etc.
†† – POP3 access requires “full membership” status or above
††† – SMTP access requires “membership” status or above
†††† – IMAP requires SnapperMail Enterprise Edition.
If you’d like to make your connection secure with SSL (requires SnapperMail Premier or Enterprise Edition, tap the More… button on the bottom of the Server page in the account settings. Then set the following according to Email protocols you are using:

POP3 Settings:
– Use Port: 995
– Always secure (wrapped port)
– Always trust server unchecked

IMAP Settings:
– Use Port: 993
– Always secure (wrapped port)
– Always trust server unchecked

SMTP Settings:
– Use Port: 465
– Always secure (wrapped port)
– Always trust server unchecked

GMail

1. These instructions require that you have the Premier or Enterprise edition of SnapperMail. Also, if you are not using Gmail’s “recent mode” you can only download messages via POP3 to one Email client program.

2. Log into your Gmail account, go into Settings, select the “Forwarding and Pop” link, and under POP3 Download, enable the type of POP3 access you want.

3. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following (see “Note 2” below for GMail’s “recent mode” information:

POP3 Server: pop.gmail.com
Username: your full GMail email address
Password: your GMail password

SMTP Server: smtp.gmail.com
Username: your full GMail email address
Password: your GMail password

IMPORTANT: Tap the “More” button at the bottom of the screen.

For POP3 Settings:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (wrapped port)”
– Use Port 995 (this port number should automatically be set when you select the SSL option listed on the line above)
– Leave the other checkboxes unchecked.

For SMTP settings, you can use either “Set” of settings below. There is no mention to the word “Set” anywhere in the SnapperMail interface. These are merely two different ways that you can configure SnapperMail to send Email using GMail’s server. Simply choose the set below that you want to use, but do not mix the settings together between both sets.

SMTP SETTINGS “More…” Set #1:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (STARTTLS)”
– Use port 587 (you will have to manually set this port number)
– Leave the other checkboxes unchecked.

SMTP SETTINGS “More…” Set #2:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (wrapped port)”
– Use port 465 (this port number should automatically be set when you select the SSL option listed on the line above)
– Leave the other checkboxes unchecked.

NOTE: Some people have reported that SnapperMail suddenly stops downloading messages from GMail, or it downloads erratically. This is usually a problem with GMail’s POP3 server, not with SnapperMail. You should login to your GMail account using a web browser. Go to the Settings (or Options) page, shut off the POP3 option and accept the change. Then go back into the Settings page again, turn the POP3 option back on and accept the change. People have reported back to us that this usually works to get GMail’s POP3 server working properly for them again.

Note 2: Using GMail POP3 on mobile or multiple devices …
If you’re accessing your Gmail using POP from multiple clients, Gmail’s recent mode makes sure that all messages are made available to each client, rather than only to the first client to access new mail. Recent mode fetches the last 30 days of mail, regardless of whether it’s been sent to another POP client already. To do this, replace ‘username@gmail.com’ in your POP client settings with ‘recent:username@gmail.com’.

GoDaddy

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.godaddy.com
Username: your entire GoDaddy Email address (i.e. username@godaddy.com or yourname@yourdomain.com)
Password: your GoDaddy password
On the “More…” screen, leave all the checkboxes unchecked (all SnapperMail editions) and select “No SSL security” (Premier/Enterprise editions).

SMTP Server: smtpout.secureserver.net
Username: your entire GoDaddy Email address (i.e. username@godaddy.com or yourname@yourdomain.com)
Password: your GoDaddy password
On the “More…” screen, leave all the checkboxes unchecked (all SnapperMail editions) and select “No SSL security” (Premier/Enterprise editions). If you have trouble using the SMTP server, try setting the port number to 3535 on the “More…” screen.

If you have difficulty setting up and/or using the GoDaddy SMTP server (i.e. you get a “501 Authentication failed” message), you may have to set up the relay configuration in your GoDaddy account. The following links provide information on what the relay is and how to set it up:
What is SMTP Relay?
How Do I set up SMTP Relay?

InsightBB

These instructions require that you have the Premier or Enterprise edition of SnapperMail. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.insightbb.com
Username: [your whole InsightBB Email address]
Password: [your InsightBB password]

SMTP Server: mail.insightbb.com
Username: [your whole InsightBB Email address]
Password: [your InsightBB password]

Tap the “More…” button in the server account settings. In that window, enter the following:
POP3 SETTINGS:
Use Port 995
Check: Use APOP Authentication
Pick: Always Secure (wrapped Port)
Check: Always trust Server

SMTP SETTINGS:
Use Port 465
Pick: Always Secure (wrapped Port)
Check: Always trust Server

Mac.com

For POP3 access, in your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.mac.com
Username: [your username] (only the part before the “@”). So if your Email address is “user@mac.com”, only enter “user” (without the quotes).
Password: [your password]

SMTP Server: smtp.mac.com
Username: [your username] (only the part before the “@”). So if your Email address is “user@mac.com”, only enter “user” (without the quotes).
password: [your password]

If you want to set up SnapperMail to use IMAP (instead of POP3) for connecting to your account, you can do that as well. This information requires (for IMAP capability) that you have SnapperMail Enterprise edition installed on your device. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

IMAP Server: mail.mac.com
Username: [your username] (only the part before the “@”). So if your Email address is “user@mac.com”, only enter “user” (without the quotes).
Password: [your password]

SMTP Server: smtp.mac.com
Username: [your username] (only the part before the “@”). So if your Email address is “user@mac.com”, only enter “user” (without the quotes).
Password: [your password]

IMPORTANT: Tap the “More” button at the bottom of the screen.

For IMAP4 Settings:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (wrapped port)”
– Accept the defaults for all of the other gadgets.

For SMTP Settings:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (STARTTLS)”
– Activate the “Always trust server” checkbox.
– Set the port number to 587.
– Accept the defaults for all of the other gadgets.

It has been suggested by some users to activate the “Sync unread mail only” checkbox in the Edit Accounts “Rules” tab for best performance.

Mindspring

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.mindspring.com
Username: [your full Mindspring email address]
Password: [your Mindspring password]

Network Solutions

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.your domain name.com (where “your domain name” is replaced by the actual name of your owned domain)
Username: your full Email address (i.e. name@domainname.com)
Password: (your Network Solutions email password)

SMTP Server: smtp.your domain name.com (where “your domain name” is replaced by the actual name of your owned domain)
Username: your full Email address (i.e. name@domainname.com)
Password: (your Network Solutions email password)

Additional settings:
POP3:
Use Port 110
Uncheck Use APOP Authentication
Check No SSL

SMTP:
Use Port 25
Uncheck POP before send
Check Secure if Available
Check Always Trust Server

SBC Global (via Prodigy)

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.sbcglobal.net
Username: [your SBC Global email address†]
Password: [your password]

SMTP Server: smtpauth.prodigy.net
Username: [your SBC Global email address†]
Password: [your password]

† – instead of your username such as “foobar” this should be your full email address e.g. foobar@sbcglobal.net

SBC Global (Yahoo Powered)

In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: [see table below††]
Username: [your email address†]
Password: [your password]

SMTP Server: [see table below†††]
Username: [your email address†]
Password: [your password]

Email Address† POP3 Server†† SMTP Server†††
MemberID@ameritech.net pop.ameritech.yahoo.com smtp.ameritech.yahoo.com
MemberID@flash.net pop.flash.yahoo.com smtp.flash.yahoo.com
MemberID@nvbell.net pop.nvbell.yahoo.com smtp.nvbell.yahoo.com
MemberID@pacbell.net pop.pacbell.yahoo.com smtp.pacbell.yahoo.com
MemberID@prodigy.net pop.prodigy.yahoo.com smtp.prodigy.yahoo.com
MemberID@sbcglobal.net pop.att.yahoo.com smtp.att.yahoo.com (See footnote below.)
MemberID@snet.net pop.snet.yahoo.com smtp.snet.yahoo.com
MemberID@swbell.net pop.swbell.yahoo.com smtp.swbell.yahoo.com
MemberID@wans.net pop.wans.yahoo.com smtp.wans.yahoo.com

The AT&T setup uses SSL. This requires that you have the Premier or Enterprise Edition of SnapperMail. In the “Server” tab, tap the “More…” button at the bottom. Configure the SSL setting to “Always secure (wrapped port)” for both POP3 and SMTP. Set the port numbers to 995 for POP3, and 465 for SMTP.

SprintPCS

1. You need to set an EMAIL password for your Sprint account:
* Go to Sprint’s web site at www.sprintpcs.com.
* Log onto your “My PCS” using your SprintPCS phone and password. Unless you have changed it, your password is the last four digits of your social security number.
* Click on “My Personal Information” located along the left side of the screen.
* Under “Passwords”, click the “Modify” link to the right of “PCS Vision User Name”. This will display your SprintPCS email address, and give you the option to change it if you wish. Write this address down for future reference, as you will need this information to setup SnapperMail on your handheld device. If you have made changes, click “Submit” to get back to the “My Personal Information” screen. If no changes were made, click “Cancel” to get back to the “My Personal Information” screen.
* Click on the “Modify” link to the right of “PCS Vision Password”, just under “PCS Vision User Name”.
* Follow the on-screen prompts to enter a new password. Note that you will need to have your phone on and in a coverage area for the password to be reset on your phone. Write down your new password for future reference, as you will need this information to setup SnapperMail on your handheld device.

2. In your SnapperMail Account settings under Server (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.sprintpcs.com
Username: [your Sprint username†]
Password: [your EMAIL password you set in step 1 above]
Note: Using Sprint’s POP3 server is not required. If you use your own ISP’s POP3 server, you can continue to do so.

SMTP Server: smtp.sprintpcs.com
Username: [your Sprint username†]
Password: [your EMAIL password you set in step 1 above]

† – Enter the portion of your SprintPCS Vision email address before the “@” here. So, if your address is myname@sprintpcs.com, your username would be myname. Some users have reported that entering only the username part does not work. If it does not work for you, please try entering your entire SprintPCS Vision email address.

Alternate information: Sprint complicates things by having three passwords – the account management password, the Vision password, and the e-mail password. This may help you: On the Sprint PCS web site, there is a ‘Preferences’ link by the compose msg function. Under the preferences, you can set up an e-mail password. THIS is the password that is assigned to the SMTP and POP servers in SnapperMail.

USA.net

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.netaddress.com
Username: your USA.net username only (without the “@usa.net”)
Password: your USA.net password
Port: 110
Use APOP Authentication is unchecked
No SSL security

SMTP Server: smtp.postoffice.net
Username: your full USA.net Email address with “@usa.net”
Password: your USA.net password
Port: 25
POP before send is checked
No SSL security

Utopia Systems

In your SnapperMail server account settings (Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: mail.utopiasystems.net
Username: your Utopia Systems username
Password: your Utopia Systems password

SMTP Server: smtp.utopiasystems.net
Username: your Utopia Systems username
Password: your Utopia Systems password

Webmail.us

The technical writer(s) at Webmail.us have created some excellent documentation for their users. They can be found at the following URLs (requires Acrobat Reader):

SnapperMail Setup Guide
SnapperMail User Guide

For quick reference, here are the main settings. In your SnapperMail server account settings (Menu | Accounts | Edit Accounts | (choose account) | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.emailsrvr.com
Username: [your entire email address, using all lower case]
Password: [your email password]

IMAP4 Server*: imap.emailsrvr.com
Username: [your entire email address, using all lower case]
Password: [your email password]

SMTP Server**: smtp.emailsrvr.com
Username: [your entire email address, using all lower case]
Password: [your email password]

SSL Secure Server Settings (Requires SnapperMail Premier or Enterprise):
1. Replace the above server names with the following secure server name:

POP3 Server: secure.emailsrvr.com
IMAP4 Server*: secure.emailsrvr.com
SMTP Server**: secure.emailsrvr.com

2. Tap the “More…” button.

POP3 Settings:
Use Port: 995
Always secure (wrapped port)
Always trust server [checked]

IMAP4 Settings*:
Use Port: 993
Always secure (wrapped port)
Always trust server [checked]

SMTP Settings**:
Use Port: 465
Always secure (wrapped port)
Always trust server [checked]

* IMAP4 Requires SnapperMail Enterprise.
** If you have trouble sending messages, tap the More button (Account Settings, Server tab) and change the SMTP port to 587. Also, some ISPs do not allow third-party SMTP servers. In that case, you will need to use your ISP’s SMTP settings.

Yahoo Mail

1. For SnapperMail to work with your Yahoo account you must have the POP access service (Mail Plus) activated. More info can be found at http://mailplus.mail.yahoo.com/

2. In your SnapperMail Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

POP3 Server: pop.mail.yahoo.com
Username: [your Yahoo username]
Password: [your Yahoo password]

SMTP Server: smtp.mail.yahoo.com
Username: [your Yahoo username]
password: [your Yahoo password]

If you experience difficulty with the above settings, first try activating the “POP before Send” checkbox in the Server SMTP Settings. Also, if you use the Premier or Enterprise Edition of SnapperMail, make sure that the SSL settings on the SnapperMail account “Server” page (tap the “More…” button at the bottom) are set to “No SSL security”.

Alltel
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using the Alltel SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Accounts | Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 settings into the Incoming Server block as per your ISP’s instructions, and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: mail.alltel.net
Username: [leave blank]
Password: [leave blank]

AT&T Wireless
CARRIER SMTP

1. Make sure that after you establish your mMode account, you pick your own username so that you get a “username@mobile.att.net” style email address. This will be your second “@mobile.att.net” email address, the first being [your-cellphone-number]@mobile.att.net

2. To configure SnapperMail to send email using AT&T Wireless’ SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: smtp.attwireless.net
Username: [your mMode username†]
Password: [your mMode password]

3. AT&T wireless will refuse authentication unless your email address is the same as your mMode email address:
* In your SnapperMail Account settings under Identity (Edit Account | Identity), enter your mMode email address, i.e. username@mobile.att.net
* If you want replies to go your normal email address, enter it in the “Reply To” area (Edit Account | Identity | Reply To).

4. AT&T Wireless appears to have quietly rolled out a new SMTP server. If the configuration in #2 and #3 above does not work for you, please try the following:

SMTP Server: pdasmtp.attwireless.net
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

NOTE: This server is only usable for devices on the ATTWS network, and according to some users it may no longer be available.
5. Another new AT&T Wireless server appears to have been rolled out or it will be soon. If none of the above configurations work for you, please try the following:

SMTP Server: smtp.mymmode.com
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

NOTE: This server is only usable for devices on the ATTWS network.

† – do not append “@mobile.att.net”

NOTE: AT&T Wireless is supposedly coming to “end of life” due to the merger with Cingular. Here is a link to the Cingular settings.

Bell Mobility Canada
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using Bell Mobility Canada’s server, go to your SnapperMail server account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: mail.1xbell.ca
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

IMPORTANT: Tap the “More” button at the bottom of the screen.

For POP3 Settings:
– Set the “Use SSL” dropdown to “Always Secure (wrapped port)”
– Use Port 995 (this port number should automatically be set when you select the SSL option listed on the line above)
– Leave the other checkboxes unchecked.

Please note that these settings have not been verified.

Comcast
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using the Comcast SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: smtp.comcast.net
Username: [your Comcast user ID] (only the part before the “@” character, not your whole Email address)
Password: [your Comcast password]

PacBell
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using the PacBell SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: smtpauth.sbcglobal.net
Username: [your complete PacBell Email address]
Password: [your PacBell Email password]

SprintPCS
CARRIER SMTP

1. You need to set an EMAIL password for your Sprint account:
* Go to Sprint’s web site at www.sprintpcs.com.
* Log onto your “My PCS” using your SprintPCS phone and password. Unless you have changed it, your password is the last four digits of your social security number.
* Click on “My Personal Information” located along the left side of the screen.
* Under “Passwords”, click the “Modify” link to the right of “PCS Vision User Name”. This will display your SprintPCS email address, and give you the option to change it if you wish. Write this address down for future reference, as you will need this information to setup SnapperMail on your handheld device. If you have made changes, click “Submit” to get back to the “My Personal Information” screen. If no changes were made, click “Cancel” to get back to the “My Personal Information” screen.
* Click on the “Modify” link to the right of “PCS Vision Password”, just under “PCS Vision User Name”.
* Follow the on-screen prompts to enter a new password. Note that you will need to have your phone on and in a coverage area for the password to be reset on your phone. Write down your new password for future reference, as you will need this information to setup SnapperMail on your handheld device.

2. In your SnapperMail Account settings under Server (Edit Accounts | Server), enter the following:

SMTP Server: smtp.sprintpcs.com
Username: [your Sprint username†]
Password: [your EMAIL password you set in step 1 above]

3. Sprint will refuse authentication unless your email address is the same as your SprintPCS Vision email address:
* In your SnapperMail Account settings under Identity (Edit Account | Identity), enter your SprintPCS email address, i.e. username@sprintpcs.com
* If you want replies to go your normal email address, enter it in the “Reply To” area (Edit Account | Identity | Reply To).

† – Enter the portion of your SprintPCS Vision email address before the “@” here. So, if your address is myname@sprintpcs.com, your username would be myname. Some users have reported that entering only the username part does not work. If it does not work for you, please try entering your entire SprintPCS Vision email address.

Alternate information: Sprint complicates things by having three passwords – the account management password, the Vision password, and the e-mail password. This may help you: On the Sprint PCS web site, there is a ‘Preferences’ link by the compose msg function. Under the preferences, you can set up an e-mail password. THIS is the password that is assigned to the SMTP and POP servers in SnapperMail.

T-Mobile (USA)
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using T-Mobile’s SMTP server account, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: myemail.t-mobile.com
Username: [your T-Mobile phone number followed by :1]
Password: [your T-Mobile password (same as you use for web access to your T-Mobile account)]

If the information above does not work for you, first try leaving the password field blank. Also, an issue may be caused by recent changes to T-Mobile’s services (reported by some users). It appears they may be requiring you to register with their mail server via their web site. This is not an issue, but it also has to mirror the server that you POP to in order to get mail. The process, is roughly to register with T-mobile, which includes entering your POP (incoming mail) server and password. Once this is done, you can then use their SMTP server, because you get an ID and password to enter in for the
myemail.t-mobile.com server. Rather than entering the username and password fields in SnapperMail as it says above, the ID and password received from the registration process should be used. When a person configures their Treo in this manner, he/she needs to turn off the Alerts option on the T-mobile web site. If that is not done, text messages which are the same as the email notes are also sent to the device.

Verizon
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using Verizon’s SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Edit Accounts | Server). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: smtp.vzwmail.net
Username: [your 10-digit cellphone number followed by @vzwmail.net]
Password: [your password that you set up on the vtext.com webpage]

Verizon sometimes assigns you a temporary password in certain circumstances. Some people have reported that they can suddenly, without changing anything, no longer send Email messages using Verizon’s SMTP server. A possible cause for this is that the temporary password has expired. You should go to the www.vtext.com web site to attempt resetting the password. If that fails, then you will need to contact Verizon support directly.

Vodafone
CARRIER SMTP

To configure SnapperMail to send email using Vodafone’s SMTP server, go to your Server Account settings (Accounts | Edit Accounts | select account | Edit | Server tab). Enter the POP3 setting as per your ISP’s instructions and enter the following for the Outgoing Mail Server:

SMTP Server: send.vodafone.net
Username: [leave blank, “optional”]
Password: [leave blank, “optional”]

NOTE: For the “SMTP Server”, you can also try using one of these:

smtp.vodafone.net
212.183.156.230

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Dhcp version 3.05 configuration example

Here is what I think is a pretty good example of some different things I was able to do with MAC addresses and assignments with a configuration for dhcp version 3.05. This is the version I tested and implemented this config with:

authoritative;
ddns-update-style none;

option domain-name “domain.name”;
option domain-name-servers xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx;
option subnet-mask 255.xxx.xxx.xxx;
option routers xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx;
option netbios-name-servers xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx;
option netbios-node-type 8;
deny bootp;
default-lease-time 864000; # 10 days
server-name “dhcp.server.name”;

# To assign a particular range to certain NICs
group {
subnet xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx netmask 255.xxx.xxx.xxx {
class “TERMINALS” {
match substring (hardware,1,3);
}
subclass “TERMINALS” 00:80:64;
pool {
allow members of “TERMINALS”;
range xxx.xxx.xxx.1 xxx.xxx.xxx.254;
}
pool {
range xxx.xxx.yyy.1 xxx.xxx.yyy.254;
}

# To statically assign the an address to a particular MAC address
host hostname1 {
hardware ethernet XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX;
fixed-address xxx.xxx.zzz.1;
}
host hostname2 {
# hardware ethernet YY:YY:YY:YY:YY:YY;
fixed-address xxx.xxx.zzz.2;
}
}
}

# To offer addresses to remote subnets.
group {
# This is a generic example that will provide only one address.
# The range can be changed to provide more addresses.
subnet zzz.zzz.zzz.0 netmask 255.xxx.xxx.xxx {
range zzz.zzz.zzz.200 zzz.zzz.zzz.200;
}

# This example will only assign one address to a particular MAC address.
# This is the only NIC that will get an address. All others will not be
# offered an address on this subnet.
subnet aaa.aaa.aaa.0 netmask 255.xxx.xxx.xxx {
class “PC” {
match substring (hardware,1,6);
}
subclass “PC” ZZ:ZZ:ZZ:ZZ:ZZ:ZZ;
pool {
allow members of “PC”;
range aaa.aaa.aaa.203 aaa.aaa.aaa.203;
}
}

# This example will open up a range of addresses, and offer the same address
# each time to the NIC with MAC address described as hostname3
subnet bbb.bbb.bbb.0 netmask 255.xxx.xxx.xxx {
range bbb.bbb.bbb.200 bbb.bbb.bbb.210;
group {
host hostname3 {
hardware ethernet AA:AA:AA:AA:AA:AA;
fixed-address bbb.bbb.bbb.222;
}
}

}
}

vmstat and paging vs swapping

Good explaination from the Linux Journal website:

Monitoring Virtual Memory with vmstat
By Brian Tanaka
Created 2005-10-31 02:00

Just using a lot of swap space doesn’t necessarily mean that you need more memory. Here’s how to tell when Linux is happy with the available memory and when it needs more.

Linux novices often find virtual memory mysterious, but with a grasp of the fundamental concepts, it’s easy to understand. With this knowledge, you can monitor your system’s memory utilization using vmstat and detect problems that can adversely affect system performance.
How Virtual Memory Works

Physical memory-the actual RAM installed-is a finite resource on any system. The Linux memory handler manages the allocation of that limited resource by freeing portions of physical memory when possible.

All processes use memory, of course, but each process doesn’t need all its allocated memory all the time. Taking advantage of this fact, the kernel frees up physical memory by writing some or all of a process’ memory to disk until it’s needed again.

The kernel uses paging and swapping to perform this memory management. Paging refers to writing portions, termed pages, of a process’ memory to disk. Swapping, strictly speaking, refers to writing the entire process, not just part, to disk. In Linux, true swapping is exceedingly rare, but the terms paging and swapping often are used interchangeably.

When pages are written to disk, the event is called a page-out, and when pages are returned to physical memory, the event is called a page-in. A page fault occurs when the kernel needs a page, finds it doesn’t exist in physical memory because it has been paged-out, and re-reads it in from disk.

Page-ins are common, normal and are not a cause for concern. For example, when an application first starts up, its executable image and data are paged-in. This is normal behavior.

Page-outs, however, can be a sign of trouble. When the kernel detects that memory is running low, it attempts to free up memory by paging out. Though this may happen briefly from time to time, if page-outs are plentiful and constant, the kernel can reach a point where it’s actually spending more time managing paging activity than running the applications, and system performance suffers. This woeful state is referred to as thrashing.

Using swap space is not inherently bad. Rather, it’s intense paging activity that’s problematic. For instance, if your most-memory-intensive application is idle, it’s fine for portions of it to be set aside when another large job is active. Memory pages belonging to an idle application are better set aside so the kernel can use physical memory for disk buffering.
Using vmstat

vmstat, as its name suggests, reports virtual memory statistics. It shows how much virtual memory there is, how much is free and paging activity. Most important, you can observe page-ins and page-outs as they happen. This is extremely useful.

To monitor the virtual memory activity on your system, it’s best to use vmstat with a delay. A delay is the number of seconds between updates. If you don’t supply a delay, vmstat reports the averages since the last boot and quit. Five seconds is the recommended delay interval.

To run vmstat with a five-second delay, type:

vmstat 5

You also can specify a count, which indicates how many updates you want to see before vmstat quits. If you don’t specify a count, the count defaults to infinity, but you can stop output with Ctrl-C.

To run vmstat with ten updates, five seconds apart, type:

vmstat 5 10

Here’s an example of a system free of paging activity:

procs memory swap io system cpu
r b w swpd free buff cache si so bi bo in cs us sy id
0 0 0 29232 116972 4524 244900 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 29232 116972 4524 244900 0 0 0 0 2560 6 0 1 99
0 0 0 29232 116972 4524 244900 0 0 0 0 2574 10 0 2 98

All fields are explained in the vmstat man page, but the most important columns for this article are free, si and so. The free column shows the amount of free memory, si shows page-ins and so shows page-outs. In this example, the so column is zero consistently, indicating there are no page-outs.

The abbreviations so and si are used instead of the more accurate po and pi for historical reasons.

Here’s an example of a system with paging activity:

procs memory swap io system cpu
r b w swpd free buff cache si so bi bo in cs us sy id
. . .
1 0 0 13344 1444 1308 19692 0 168 129 42 1505 713 20 11 69
1 0 0 13856 1640 1308 18524 64 516 379 129 4341 646 24 34 42
3 0 0 13856 1084 1308 18316 56 64 14 0 320 1022 84 9 8

Notice the nonzero so values indicating there is not enough physical memory and the kernel is paging out. You can use top and ps to identify the processes that are using the most memory.

You also can use top to show memory and swap statistics. Here is an example of the uppermost portion of a typical top report:

14:23:19 up 348 days, 3:02, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
55 processes: 54 sleeping, 1 running, 0 zombie, 0 stopped
CPU states: 0.0% user, 2.4% system, 0.0% nice, 97.6% idle
Mem: 481076K total, 367508K used, 113568K free, 4712K buffers
Swap: 1004052K total, 29852K used, 974200K free, 244396K cached

For more information about top, see the top man page.
Conclusion

It isn’t necessarily bad for your system to be using some of its swap space. But if you discover your system is often running low on physical memory and paging is causing performance to suffer, add more memory. If you can’t add more memory, run memory-intensive jobs at different times of the day, avoid running nonessential jobs when memory demand is high or distribute jobs across multiple systems if possible.

List installed perl modules script

Source: http://www.cpan.org/misc/cpan-faq.html

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

use ExtUtils::Installed;
my $instmod = ExtUtils::Installed->new();
foreach my $module ($instmod->modules()) {
my $version = $instmod->version($module) || “???”;
print “$module — $version\n”;
}

Protected: OpenVPN installation – used on CentOS/Redhat/Fedora

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Mount error solution – special device LABEL=/xxx does not exist

Appliies Fedora/Redhat/CentOS,etc., but I have just using the OSes mentioned:

I started to run into this with ext3 when changing mount points:
From the /etc/fstab

LABEL=/backup /backup ext3 defaults 1 2

mount /backup

Error message:
mount: special device LABEL=/backup does not exist

tune2fs -L /backup /dev/cciss/c0d2p1
tune2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
mount /backup

FWTK and Squid notes

Found this on the internet from 1999:

> Can anyone tell me how I can configurate Squid as an Internal
> proxy-server witch forward internal requested to a FWTK firewall.

Using the cache_peer directive, set it as a parent with the option no-query.

e.g. cache_peer fw.domain.com parent 8080 7 no-query

Clean Vista installation from upgrade disk.

Found this on this, but it was removed from the source site.

1. Boot from the Windows Vista Upgrade DVD and start the setup program.
2. When prompted to enter your product key, DO NOT enter it. Click “Next” and proceed with setup. This will install Windows Vista as a 30-day trial.
3. When prompted, select the edition of Vista which you have purchased and continue with setup.
4. Once setup has been completed and you have been brought to the desktop for the first time, run the install program from within Windows Vista.
5. This time, type in your product key when prompted.
6. When asked whether to perform an Upgrade or Custom (advanced) install, choose Custom (advanced) to perform a clean install of Vista. Yes, this means that you will have to install Vista for a second time.
7. Once setup has completed for the second time, you should be able to activate Windows Vista normally. You can also delete the Windows.old directory which contains information from the first Vista install.

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